Self-Publishing on Createspace – Part 6

To learn how to set up your Createspace account, then create a book, please do catch up by reading Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4 and Part 5.

#7. File Review

Once you have received and email from Createspace, saying that your book has been approved, you can now view an online proof copy (which is like the online reviewer used previously), you can download a PDF proof and you can also order a printed proof copy.

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(If the email says that you need to make changes before they will approve it, then make the appropriate changes and re-submit it for reviewing).

#8. Proof Your Book

Even though I have published many books now, and I probably could just look at the online proof and approve the book, I still ALWAYS order a paperback proof copy. Why? Because I like to do one last proofread before publishing, and also because occasionally something might not go to plan on the cover or in the front and back matter. In my last book, for example, the book title on the title page was not in the right place, and looked odd, which I hadn’t noticed on the online proof copy. It’s much easier to spot formatting errors and also spelling mistakes and typos, when the book is in printed format. And even if it’s been edited and proofread extensively, and you’ve employed all kids of tactics, I promise you, there will still be more errors lurking in there.

The proof copy will be the most expensive copy you will buy, as you will have a huge postage cost for just one book, which in the future will be spread out over lots of books. You can buy up to 5 proof copies, so you could get some extra if you have willing friends to look over them for you. They will have ‘Proof’ in large letters on the final page of the book, so there’s no point buying too many as they won’t be saleable.

If you find errors in the print copy, then you can make changes to the original document, and re-upload it, but you will then have to re-submit the book for Createspace to review it and approve it, which will take another 24-48 hours.

Once you are happy with the proof, you can approve it, which will mean that it will be available to buy on Amazon within a few days, and that you can now buy copies at cost price.

In the next part, I will go through the distribution and pricing sections.

 

 


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Michelle is the author and publisher of 8 Visionary Fiction novels, all available on Amazon in paperback and on Kindle. She spends her days helping Indie Authors to publish their books, taking photographs and making gluten-free cakes.

If you need any help with your publishing journey, please do get in touch with her by emailing theamethystangel@hotmail.co.uk. You can book a Skype session or a phone call with her, or ask questions via email. Please do follow this blog to receive more posts on Indie Publishing.


Disclaimer:All views, ideas and tips presented on this website are my own, based on my own experience and the experience of my clients. It is by no means the only way to do it, or the right way to do it, but it is the way that works for me. Please take what helps you and makes sense to you, and don’t worry about the rest for now. Please know that I take no responsibility for anything that happens as a result of you following my advice. I have created this blog as a resource for Indie Authors to help them make the publishing journey a little easier. I am not affiliated with any of the companies I mention, other than the fact that I use their services myself.

 

 

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Self-Publishing on Createspace – Part 5

Welcome to part 5 of the Self-publishing on Createspace Series. You can catch up by viewing Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 and Part 4. I will dive straight into the next step which is uploading the cover.

#5.  Book Cover

At this stage, you will either have a PDF of your full cover (ie. the front cover, spine and back cover all in one) or you will have JPGs of the front and back cover separately. There is a cover designer in Createspace, but as it is very basic, I would recommend that you get your cover designed and made into a full PDF as it will look more professional. When I first started out, I used to use the creator to do the spine and upload the front and back images, which is okay, but you won’t be able to add the publishing logo to your spine, and as I discussed in an earlier post, that’s actually quite an important part of your cover.

To help your designer to work out the sizing for the PDF, you will need to know the final page count, and then using the info in this page, work out the spine width. 

I will go through the process of uploading the PDF first. Click on Cover in the menu. The first choice you need to make is – Matte cover or Glossy cover. Both are good choices, I have published my Earth Angel series with glossy covers, and my Visionary Collection with matte. Go into a bookshop and look at books in the same genre as yours. I found that many fantasy and sci-fi books actually had glossy covers, while romance books tended to have matte covers. I believe that the choice of cover is a personal one, though I must admit, more than anything, I just love the way the matte covers feel!

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To upload your PDF, you want to choose the 3rd option  – Upload a Print-Ready PDF Cover

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Then browse for your PDF file:

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Then hit save, and it will upload.

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Once it is uploaded, you can click on continue, to move onto the next step, which will be covered tomorrow.

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If you have separate JPG images for the front and back cover that you wish to upload, you will need to use the cover creator, which is option 1. Click on Launch Cover Creator.

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You’ll need to scroll through the templates to page 5, and choose the The Palm and click OK.

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Then you will go through each step, uploading the front and back covers, and choosing the spine colour. The spine text will be entered from the info you have already entered, but you can tweak it if you want to. If your book is any colour other than black or white, then you may find it difficult to match the spine colour as there is a very limited selection of covers to choose from. Your images will need to be at least 300DPI and the right size for the book trim size you have chosen.

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In the example above, this cover would be deemed unacceptable, because there is text in the red area around the edge. Createspace will not allow any vital info to be in these red areas in case it is cut off in the printing and trimming process, so you will have to ensure the title and other text is within the middle area.

Once you have completed the steps, you can click Submit Cover, and then you can review the PDF they create of the cover to check that it looks right. Then you can click Save and Continue.

#6. Complete Setup

The next step is a quick one – you just need to click to submit your book to be reviewed by Createspace! The review could take between 24 and 48 hours, and they will email you to let you know whether they have found your book to be printable or not. If it is not, they will tell you why, if it is not clear why, then you can email them to ask for more information, or call them (they’re there 24/7 but the number is a US number, so will cost a bit if you’re calling from the UK)

Congratulations! I will cover the next steps of the process soon.

 


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Michelle is the author and publisher of 8 Visionary Fiction novels, all available on Amazon in paperback and on Kindle. She spends her days helping Indie Authors to publish their books, taking photographs and making gluten-free cakes.

If you need any help with your publishing journey, please do get in touch with her by emailing theamethystangel@hotmail.co.uk. You can book a Skype session or a phone call with her, or ask questions via email. Please do follow this blog to receive more posts on Indie Publishing.


Disclaimer:All views, ideas and tips presented on this website are my own, based on my own experience and the experience of my clients. It is by no means the only way to do it, or the right way to do it, but it is the way that works for me. Please take what helps you and makes sense to you, and don’t worry about the rest for now. Please know that I take no responsibility for anything that happens as a result of you following my advice. I have created this blog as a resource for Indie Authors to help them make the publishing journey a little easier. I am not affiliated with any of the companies I mention, other than the fact that I use their services myself.

 

 

Self-Publishing on Createspace – Part 3

Thanks for joining me again for part 3 of my publishing in Createspace series! If you need help setting up your account, please check out Part 1 and Part 2 first.

In this post, I will cover the first part of setting up your book title on Createspace. I will take you through the process in as much detail as possible, but if you have any questions, please ask in the comments below.

#1. Add New Title

From the Member Dashboard, click on ‘Add New Title‘ then you will be taken to this screen. Enter the title of your book, (which you can change at a later date if you wish) choose ‘paperback’ and then choose the ‘Guided’ process.

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#2. Title Information

You will then start on this page. As you can see, the steps of the publishing process are on the left-hand menu, and when you complete each one, they will go green. For this page, you will need the basic info of the book – title, author name (I wouldn’t recommend putting a title – Mr or Miss, as it looks a little silly on the product page. But obviously if you are a Dr and it is relevant to the book, use it). Say if it’s a series and what the series name is, the edition number and the language. You won’t be able to put a future date in the ‘publication date‘ part, so unless you’re ready to publish immediately, I’d leave this blank. Then hit Save & Continue.

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#3. ISBN

The next step is the ISBN. You can choose to have a free Createspace-assigned ISBN, or enter your own that you have bought and registered. If you choose the free one, you can only use it on Createspace (you cannot take it with you if you decide to re-publish elsewhere) and it will list Createspace as the publisher in the Product Information on Amazon. I have used the free Createspace ISBNs for all my books so far, and I’m quite happy with that, if I wanted to publish my book with a company offering extended distribution in the UK at a later date, I would have to buy my own ISBNs then. Does it matter having the same book published by two different companies bearing two different ISBNs? I’m not sure it does, although it may affect re-selling on Amazon.

Have a look at all of the information on the ISBN page before deciding what you want to do. If you decide to purchase your own, the process to do so will depend on your country, and I would recommend you doing some research on how to go about doing so.

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If you choose a Createspace assigned ISBN, you will then end up on this page:

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You will need to copy the ISBN and paste it onto the legal page in your book, and when it comes to the cover, Createspace will generate the right barcode for that number for you.

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Tune in soon for Part 4!


IMG_5734_2Michelle is the author and publisher of 8 Visionary Fiction novels, all available on Amazon in paperback and on Kindle. She spends her days helping Indie Authors to publish their books, taking photographs and making gluten-free cakes. If you need any help with your publishing journey, please do get in touch with her by emailing theamethystangel@hotmail.co.uk. You can book a Skype session or a phone call with her, or ask questions via email. Please do follow this blog to receive more posts on Indie Publishing.


Disclaimer:All views, ideas and tips presented on this website are my own, based on my own experience and the experience of my clients. It is by no means the only way to do it, or the right way to do it, but it is the way that works for me. Please take what helps you and makes sense to you, and don’t worry about the rest for now. Please know that I take no responsibility for anything that happens as a result of you following my advice. I have created this blog as a resource for Indie Authors to help them make the publishing journey a little easier. I am not affiliated with any of the companies I mention, other than the fact that I use their services myself.